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ILLLUMIATI BIOPIRACY OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLE's TRADITIONAL MEDICINAL KNOWLEDGE


The illuminati multi-national pharmaceutical companies are learning of medicinal plants through indigenous people and then patenting those plants and making millions of dollars off of indigenous people's knowledge without reimbursing them. A particularily bad case of this happened to the San people of South Africa, Angola, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.



The San people utilized a native plant as a hunger supressant. The San people had known about the hunger supressant nature of the plant for hundreds of years and had used the plant to supress hunger in periods of famine.

In 1996 scientists from the South African Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) isolated the hunger-suppressing chemical component in Hoodia, now known as P57, and patented it. In 1997, CSIR licensed the UK-based firm Phytopharm to further develop and commercialize P57.



The following year, Phytopharm licensed drug giant Pfizer (of Viagra fame) to develop and market P57, with none of the projected royalties being earmarked for the San people. A British spokesperson for Pfizer that described P57, said that the San people were "extinct".

The San people felt that their heritage had been plundered and a few years later a claim was launched against the CSIR stating that it had failed to comply with the rules of the Convention on Biological Diversity 1992 (CBD), requiring prior informed consent. Consequently, a "memorandum of understanding" was reached between the parties in March 2002.

After the San people had protested and been awarded their rights, the illuminati refused to release the drug anymore. The San people had worked through the international courts to get an equity stake in the drugs manufacturing. For three years, the South Africa San Council negotiated with the CSIR on behalf of the San in Angola, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. In a unique arrangement, the San would share profits across borders. The San people would receive 6 to 8% of the revenue from the sale of Hoodia products.

Soon after the agreement was made however the illuminati made the company who held the patent go bankrupt and the bio-patent for the hoodia plant has never been utilized - it's just languished unmanufactured and the San people have gotten NOTHING. The patent was sold to illuminati company Unilever who then killed the project making up false claims of saftey problems. If it's so unsafe, why have the San people been eating it for centuries? If it's so unsafe, why isn't the FDA cracking down on people selling Hoodia products online?



The illuminati intentionally bankrupted the company and killed the Hoodia projecdt as a punishment to the San people for trying to protect their rights. The illuminati's response to the San people trying to get some compensation for a discovery the San people enabled was to kill the whole project and screw over everyone.

Believed to have been in existence for some 30,000 years, the San once inhabited much of South Africa. Waves of migrating African nations and apartheid regimes, however, have dispossessed the San from their territories and pushed them into the country's southwest corner. Today, the San who remain are physically dispersed and report a fading sense of culture and community.

Many of them saw the commercial success of hoodia as the key to the prosperity of their culture in the future. But in 15 years they've seen no economic return at all from Hoodia. Meanwhile, Hoodia is sold online in its native cactus form and illegal harvesting of Hoodia plants has endangered the San people's own access to the plant - which has other important properties and is used extensively in their culture.

The illuminati did not want to set a precedent that they would honor native people's rights. The message was sent that if native peoples tried to protect their rights, the illuminati would figure out some other way to screw them over. Afterwards, many native groups - such as amazonians who have specialized rainforest knowledge - were intimidated to sign away their rights.